Tag Archives: MAA

ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Gold Architecture

The Gold architecture for MAA is used to emphasis the application continuity. All the possible outages (planned or no) are protected by Oracle features. Here we are one step further and start to design using multi-site architecture. Data Guard, RAC, Oracle Clusterware, everything is there. But even with these, ZDLRA is still needed to allow complete protection.

The image above taken from https://www.oracle.com/a/tech/docs/maa-overview-onpremise-2019.pdf.

With the MAA references, we have the blueprints and highlights how to protect them since the standalone/single instance until the multiple site database. But for Gold we are beyond RPO and RTO, they are important but application continuity and data continuity join to complete the whole picture.

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Silver Architecture

The MAA defined Silver architecture for database environments that use (or need) high availability to survive for outages. The idea is having more than one single instance running, and to do that, it relies on Oracle Clusterware and Engineered Systems to mitigate the single point of failure. But is not just a database that gains with this, the Silver architecture is the first step to have application continuity. And again, ZDLRA is there since the beginning.

As you can see above, the Silver by MAA blueprints improves compared with Bronze architecture that I spoke at the last post. But the basic points are there: RPO and RTO. They continue to base rule here. And the goals are the same: Data Availability, Data Protection, Performance (no impact), Cost (lower cost), and Risk (reduce). More technical details here at the MAA Overview doc.

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Bronze Architecture

Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) means more than just Data Guard or Golden Gate to survive outages, is related to data protection, data availability, and application continuity. MAA defines four reference architectures that can be used to guide during the deploy/design of your environment, and ZDLRA is there for all architectures.

Image above taken from https://www.oracle.com/a/tech/docs/maa-overview-onpremise-2019.pdf.

With the MAA references, we have the blueprints and highlights how to protect them since the standalone/single instance until the multiple site database. The MAA goal is to survive an outage but also sustain: Data Availability, Data Protection, Performance (no impact), Cost (lower cost), and Risk (reduce).

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MAA, Blueprints and On-Premise Architecture Reference

The Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) is the correct way to protect your Oracle database environment (and investment). It covers from a simple single instance to Exadata/Engineered Systems RAC and a multi-site database with Data Guard protection. But do you know that to reach the MAA (whatever the architecture level that you are protecting) you need to use ZDLRA?

So, I will start a series of posts to cover the MAA and ZDLRA. Discussing what you need to do (and how) to reach the maximum level of availability as is at the MAA architecture (as defined in the documentation and best practices: Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) Blueprints for On-PremisesMAA Best Practices – Oracle Database, and Maximum Availability with Oracle Database 19c).

Why ZDLRA?

The question is why ZDLRA is needed? The point from ZDLRA is that it can (and needed to be used) to protect and reach zero RPO to all architectures. ZDLRA is more (much more) than just a backup appliance, is the core of every MAA design. You can’t reach zero RPO without using it.

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ZDLRA, Virtual Private Catalog User – VPC

The Virtual Private Catalog (VPC) user is a key piece for a good ZDLRA architecture design. The detail is not how to create it, but how to correctly integrate it in your design, and this is more important if you have replicated ZDLRA or using Real-Time redo transport.

Here I will show and discuss VPC implications for your architecture design when deploying ZDLRA. Even for a complete and new implementation (together with database) or adding ZDLRA at your already running environment. All points here try to show some perspectives and key points that can help you to correct use and define VPC’s.

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ZDLRA, Webinar

On 18/Dec/2019 I presented a webinar about ZDLRA: Understanding ZDLRA. This was done through the Luxembourg Oracle User Group (LUXOUG).

In this webinar, I covered some details about what it is, and some features that are part of ZDLRA. Besides that, I showed internals details about how it stores and indexes the backups. 

If you lose it, you can watch now. It is free. Just check these two links:

You can download the presentation here too: Understanding ZDLRA.

Fell free to follow my website and check more details for ZDLRA and other posts about EXADATA, MAA, and Oracle.

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ZDLRA, Real-Time Redo

Real-time redo transport is the feature that allows you to reduce to zero the RPO (Recovery Point Objective) for your database. Check how to configure real-time redo, the steps, parameters, and other details that need to be modified to enable it.

The idea behind real-time redo transport it is easy, basically the ZDLRA it is a remote destination for your redo log buffers/archivelogs of your database. It is really, really, similar to what occurs for data guard configurations (but here you don’t need to set all datafiles as an example). It is not the same too because ZDLRA can detect if the database stops/crash and will generate the archivelog (at ZDLRA side) with all the received redo and this can be used to restore to, at least zero/sub-seconds, of data loss.

Using real-time redo it is the only way to reach RPO zero. With other features of ZDLRA, you can have a better backup window time (but just that) using incremental backups. Just using real-time redo you reach zero RPO and this impacts directly how to configure for MAA compliance. There are a lot of options and level of protection for MAA that you can check at “Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) – On-Premises HA Reference Architectures 2019”, “Maximum Availability Architecture Best Practices for Oracle Cloud”, “Oracle MAA Reference Architectures”, “Maximum Availability Architecture – Best Practices for Oracle Database 19c”.

This post starts from one environment that you already enrolled in the database at ZDLRA. I already wrote about how to do that, you can check here in my previous post. This is the first post about real-time redo, here you will see how to configure and verify it is working.

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Observer, More Than One

Recently I made a post about a little issue that I got with Oracle Data Guard. In that scenario, because of outage in the standby datacenter, healthy primary database shutdown with error “ORA-16830: primary isolated…”. Just to remember that the database was running with Maximum Availability, Fail-Start Failover enabled, and (the most important detail) the Observer was running in the standby datacenter too.

The point from my previous post tried to show that does not exists one doc that provides full details about “pros” and “cons” where put your observer. Whatever the place, on the primary datacenter or in standby, it has little details to check. Even the best (ideal) scenario, with a third datacenter, can be tough to sustain.

Here I will try to show one option that can help you and improve the reliability of your MAA/DG environment. At least, you will have more options to decide how to protect your database. Bellow, I show some details about how to configure and use multiple observers, but if you want to jump and see a little concern you can directly to the end of the post.

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