Category Archives: Data Guard

Oracle Data Guard e assuntos relacionados.

Oracle Engineered Systems since 2010

Recently I made a tweet about a new project with Oracle Engineered System (X9M) that remembered me about what I made with these systems until now. So, this opened the opportunity to tell my background and history until now working with these systems. Is not a show-off of ego boost post.

 

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21c, VALIDATE FAST_START FAILOVER

The new Oracle 21c delivered a new feature for Data Guard Broker called VALIDATE FAST_START FAILOVER. As you can imagine, helps you do validate your configuration and you can check some information at the official doc.

Syntax

The syntax is simple and has no parameters. Just VALIDATE FAST_START FAILOVER:

DGMGRL> help validate

Performs an exhaustive set of validations for a member

Syntax:

  VALIDATE DATABASE [VERBOSE] <database name>;

  VALIDATE DATABASE [VERBOSE] <database name> DATAFILE <datafile number>
    OUTPUT=<file name>;

  VALIDATE DATABASE [VERBOSE] <database name> SPFILE;

  VALIDATE DATABASE [VERBOSE] <database name> STRICT
    { TEMP_FILES | FLASHBACK | LOG_FILES_CLEARED | LOG_FILE_CONFIGURATION |
      APPLY_PROPERTY | TRANSPORT_PROPERTY | ALL }
    [ <strict option> ... <strict option> ];

  VALIDATE FAR_SYNC [VERBOSE] <far_sync name>
    [WHEN PRIMARY IS <database name>];

  VALIDATE NETWORK CONFIGURATION FOR { ALL | <member name> };

  VALIDATE STATIC CONNECT IDENTIFIER FOR { ALL | <database name> };

  VALIDATE FAST_START FAILOVER;

DGMGRL>

And can be used even with FAST_TART failover disabled:

DGMGRL> VALIDATE FAST_START FAILOVER;
  Fast-Start Failover:   Disabled
  Protection Mode:      MaxAvailability
  Primary:              ora21dg

Fast-start failover not possible:
  Fast-start failover is disabled.

Other issues:
  Fast-start failover threshold may be too low for RAC databases.
DGMGRL>

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21c, PREPARE DATABASE FOR DATA GUARD

With the release of Oracle 21c is time for us to start to check the new features. Besides 21c is an innovative release, it shows what we will use in the future in daily activities. For Data Guard and Broker one new feature is the PREPARE DATABASE FOR DATA GUARD that adjusts the database and some parameters to become primary. Release notes can be checked here.

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Platinum Architecture

The Platinum architecture is the last defined at MAA references and is the highest level of protection that you can achieve for MAA. It goes beyond the Gold protection (that I explained in my previous post) and you can have application continuity even version upgrade for your database.

The image above was taken from https://www.oracle.com/a/tech/docs/maa-overview-onpremise-2019.pdf

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Gold Architecture

The Gold architecture for MAA is used to emphasis the application continuity. All the possible outages (planned or no) are protected by Oracle features. Here we are one step further and start to design using multi-site architecture. Data Guard, RAC, Oracle Clusterware, everything is there. But even with these, ZDLRA is still needed to allow complete protection.

The image above taken from https://www.oracle.com/a/tech/docs/maa-overview-onpremise-2019.pdf.

With the MAA references, we have the blueprints and highlights how to protect them since the standalone/single instance until the multiple site database. But for Gold we are beyond RPO and RTO, they are important but application continuity and data continuity join to complete the whole picture.

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Silver Architecture

The MAA defined Silver architecture for database environments that use (or need) high availability to survive for outages. The idea is having more than one single instance running, and to do that, it relies on Oracle Clusterware and Engineered Systems to mitigate the single point of failure. But is not just a database that gains with this, the Silver architecture is the first step to have application continuity. And again, ZDLRA is there since the beginning.

As you can see above, the Silver by MAA blueprints improves compared with Bronze architecture that I spoke at the last post. But the basic points are there: RPO and RTO. They continue to base rule here. And the goals are the same: Data Availability, Data Protection, Performance (no impact), Cost (lower cost), and Risk (reduce). More technical details here at the MAA Overview doc.

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ZDLRA + MAA, Protection for Bronze Architecture

Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) means more than just Data Guard or Golden Gate to survive outages, is related to data protection, data availability, and application continuity. MAA defines four reference architectures that can be used to guide during the deploy/design of your environment, and ZDLRA is there for all architectures.

Image above taken from https://www.oracle.com/a/tech/docs/maa-overview-onpremise-2019.pdf.

With the MAA references, we have the blueprints and highlights how to protect them since the standalone/single instance until the multiple site database. The MAA goal is to survive an outage but also sustain: Data Availability, Data Protection, Performance (no impact), Cost (lower cost), and Risk (reduce).

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MAA, Blueprints and On-Premise Architecture Reference

The Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) is the correct way to protect your Oracle database environment (and investment). It covers from a simple single instance to Exadata/Engineered Systems RAC and a multi-site database with Data Guard protection. But do you know that to reach the MAA (whatever the architecture level that you are protecting) you need to use ZDLRA?

So, I will start a series of posts to cover the MAA and ZDLRA. Discussing what you need to do (and how) to reach the maximum level of availability as is at the MAA architecture (as defined in the documentation and best practices: Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) Blueprints for On-PremisesMAA Best Practices – Oracle Database, and Maximum Availability with Oracle Database 19c).

Why ZDLRA?

The question is why ZDLRA is needed? The point from ZDLRA is that it can (and needed to be used) to protect and reach zero RPO to all architectures. ZDLRA is more (much more) than just a backup appliance, is the core of every MAA design. You can’t reach zero RPO without using it.

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Fast-Start Failover, Observe-Only Mode and Health Conditions

Oracle Data Guard Broker allows the database administrators to automate some tasks and an easy way to configure properly a lot of features and details for data guard environments. The Fast-Start FailOver (FSFO) allows the broker to automatically failover to standby database in case of failure of the primary. But until 19c the only option is always to trigger the failover. This changed at 19c with a nice new feature that allows us to put FSFO in Observe-Only Mode.

In this post, I will focus just on new features for FSFO like Observer-Only Mode and Health Conditions for it. Lag and other details will not be covered here.

Observe-Only Mode

The Observe-Only Mode is a simple change that allows putting the FSFO to just observing/monitoring the DG environment, but in case of failure, it does not change the roles between primary and standby. Simple like that. As the Broker documentation for Observe-Only Mode says:

The observe-only mode enables you to test the impact of using fast-start failover in your configuration, without making any actual changes to the configuration.

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DB_UNIQUE_NAME, PDB, and Data Guard

When you change the parameters for the database is possible to specify the db_unique_name and allow more control where you want to apply/use it. This is very useful to limit the scope, but you need to be aware of some collateral effects. Even not present at the official doc, you can use it. But check here some details that you need to take care of.

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